Voice.Global website

  • About

    Voice believes in periodically reviewing on matters that touch the five rightsholder groups around the three thematic areas. According to this year’s Context Analysis, Kenya has seen significant changes in the contexts affecting the relationship between CSOs and policymakers. With increased democratisation, and advances in information and communication technologies, there is potential for progressive partnerships between Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) and policy-makers in Kenya. However, work remains to be done to make policy and practice more pro-rightsholders.

    This Call for Proposals, inspired by the context analysis, wishes to take advantage of the decentralised government system, where greater decision making power and finance are provided at local levels, to guard against the erosion of gains in the run-up to the 2022 Elections. Some Counties have seen increased citizen participation and promoted civil society activity as people have responded to opportunities to influence decisions that affect their lives.

    What are we looking for?

    Grassroots Civil Society Organisations (CSOs), coalitions, networks or collaborative partnerships are invited to submit proposals that are moving beyond service delivery to informed advocacy as an important route to social change and a means of holding governments to account. The context analysis highlights that political context is a crucial factor regarding CSO work and evidence use. Policy processes are inherently political. Contestation, institutional pressures and vested interests are highly significant, as are the attitudes, capacities and incentives among policymakers. Therefore, proposed projects need to demonstrate how they can navigate this space to best influence policy and practice at the local level.

    There are many different options that you might wish to pursue, but here are some examples of actions/interventions we are looking for, to inspire your thoughts;-

    • Strengthening the space for women and youth in decision-making and leadership at the County level;
    • Mental shift from tribal-based politics to issue-based elections where leaders are elected out of their competence and policies and not by their tribe;
    • Redefining and/or re-emphasising the ‘watchdog’ role of the media that requires deep analysis into complex social issues and policy environments. A shift from sensationalism to broader socio-economic issues impacting on the lives of rightsholders;
    • Using non-traditional lobby and advocacy techniques to influence policy or attitude change within communities;
    • Meaningful engagement of rightsholders in local government/community development through public participation as a constitutional right;
    • The lobby and advocacy initiatives seeking to influence national and local authorities to take concrete steps to make public contracting processes more transparent and accountable, as well as efficient in their respective counties;
    • Massive digitalisation in public institutions has further marginalised discriminated groups. There is, therefore, need to promote collaboration with these institutions to increase the appetite in Big Data management. Securing Indigenous Pastoralists’ Rights in Kenya’s Big Data Agenda is an example of such efforts with support from Voice in Kenya.

    Voice in Kenya will prioritise collaborations among organisations led by or representing marginalised communities and those bringing expertise on effective policy and practice engagement. We will have a preference for projects that are truly committed to putting Voice rightsholders in the lead.

    Priority is given to applications led by organisations that represent or work on, for, and/or with the following rightsholder groups:

    • Vulnerable elderly and young people
    • Indigenous groups and ethnic minorities
    • LGBTI People
    • People with disabilities
    • Women facing exploitation, abuse, and violence

    Intersectionality is at the very heart of Voice. Therefore, we have a strong preference for selecting projects that intend to work with more than one of the Voice rightsholder groups to address overlapping or cross-cutting challenges and promote inter-and/or intra-group solidarity

    For more ideas on what issues Voice prioritises on, please read the Voice Context Analysis summary. The full report will be made available upon request.

    Proposals need to be at least 18 – 30 months with a budget of up to €200,000.

    What do we mean by Influencing?

    Based on the Voice Theory of Change, Influencing is the process where rightsholders and their representatives will use a range of lobby and advocacy tools to influence individuals, families, communities, private business, religious leaders, (social) media, and other decision makers’ policies, practices, and behaviours. Ultimately, the combined interventions will lead to rightsholders:

    • claiming their rights as equal citizens;
    • having meaningful participation in political, economic, and social spheres, and;
    • accessing services and resources.

    Influencing should happen and move across multiple levels from individuals to communities to (sub-) national to international. Actions at the individual level can reinforce actions at other levels.

    Influencing grant targets organisations and networks to strengthen their lobby and advocacy capacities and amplify the voices of rightsholder groups.

    Who do we wish to fund?

    Applications will be accepted from ONLY locally registered not-for-profit local organisations working outside of Nairobi. We however would like to continue working in the following counties – Tana River, Kilifi, Kakamega, Laikipia, Samburu, and Narok County.  Applicants registered outside these Counties are nevertheless eligible to apply as far as they have a project base/office in the focal Counties and can provide the intervention there without undue travel cost on Voice. International organisations are NOT eligible to apply as lead organisations but can be co-applicants in case of consortium applications.

    What we won’t fund:

    • Organisations with an annual turnover of over €2 million.
    • An application where the grant awarded from Voice is more than 50% of the total annual income of the applicant organisation.
      • The way to calculate this is to divide the requested amount by number of years the project will be implemented. The result will then be divided by the annual income.
      • If the result of this calculation is over 50% you can either reduce the requested amount or team up as part of a consortium where you can add up the annual incomes.
    • Funding of commercial services, investment or other commercial activities.

    Practicing the Values of Voice

    Voice believes in the principle of Nothing About Us Without Us. In practice, this means Voice rightsholder groups need to be at the centre of any effort. They must be involved in the conceptualisation, planning, and implementation of any grant. They are equal partners in any consortium, network, or coalition, playing key governance and leadership roles.

    Linking and Learning

    Linking and Learning is at the heart and soul of Voice. All grantees are expected to participate in facilitated meetings and gatherings enabling the exchange of ideas and learnings from each other’s experiences.  Applicants must demonstrate in their proposals how they will identify, document, and share their learnings as they implement their project. These may come in many forms such as blog posts, videos, photo essay or audio recordings.

    Voice values diversity and inclusion. All grantees are expected to be able to interact with and learn from a diverse group of people coming from different backgrounds, orientations, and experiences. Interested applicants must be willing to work in a diverse community, which includes representatives from all of the Voice rightsholder groups.

    • About

      Voice believes in periodically reviewing on matters that touch the five rightsholder groups around the three thematic areas. According to this year’s Context Analysis, Kenya has seen significant changes in the contexts affecting the relationship between CSOs and policymakers. With increased democratisation, and advances in information and communication technologies, there is potential for progressive partnerships between Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) and policy-makers in Kenya. However, work remains to be done to make policy and practice more pro-rightsholders.

      This Call for Proposals, inspired by the context analysis, wishes to take advantage of the decentralised government system, where greater decision making power and finance are provided at local levels, to guard against the erosion of gains in the run-up to the 2022 Elections. Some Counties have seen increased citizen participation and promoted civil society activity as people have responded to opportunities to influence decisions that affect their lives.

      What are we looking for?

      Grassroots Civil Society Organisations (CSOs), coalitions, networks or collaborative partnerships are invited to submit proposals that are moving beyond service delivery to informed advocacy as an important route to social change and a means of holding governments to account. The context analysis highlights that political context is a crucial factor regarding CSO work and evidence use. Policy processes are inherently political. Contestation, institutional pressures and vested interests are highly significant, as are the attitudes, capacities and incentives among policymakers. Therefore, proposed projects need to demonstrate how they can navigate this space to best influence policy and practice at the local level.

      There are many different options that you might wish to pursue, but here are some examples of actions/interventions we are looking for, to inspire your thoughts;-

      • Strengthening the space for women and youth in decision-making and leadership at the County level;
      • Mental shift from tribal-based politics to issue-based elections where leaders are elected out of their competence and policies and not by their tribe;
      • Redefining and/or re-emphasising the ‘watchdog’ role of the media that requires deep analysis into complex social issues and policy environments. A shift from sensationalism to broader socio-economic issues impacting on the lives of rightsholders;
      • Using non-traditional lobby and advocacy techniques to influence policy or attitude change within communities;
      • Meaningful engagement of rightsholders in local government/community development through public participation as a constitutional right;
      • The lobby and advocacy initiatives seeking to influence national and local authorities to take concrete steps to make public contracting processes more transparent and accountable, as well as efficient in their respective counties;
      • Massive digitalisation in public institutions has further marginalised discriminated groups. There is, therefore, need to promote collaboration with these institutions to increase the appetite in Big Data management. Securing Indigenous Pastoralists’ Rights in Kenya’s Big Data Agenda is an example of such efforts with support from Voice in Kenya.

      Voice in Kenya will prioritise collaborations among organisations led by or representing marginalised communities and those bringing expertise on effective policy and practice engagement. We will have a preference for projects that are truly committed to putting Voice rightsholders in the lead.

      Priority is given to applications led by organisations that represent or work on, for, and/or with the following rightsholder groups:

      • Vulnerable elderly and young people
      • Indigenous groups and ethnic minorities
      • LGBTI People
      • People with disabilities
      • Women facing exploitation, abuse, and violence

      Intersectionality is at the very heart of Voice. Therefore, we have a strong preference for selecting projects that intend to work with more than one of the Voice rightsholder groups to address overlapping or cross-cutting challenges and promote inter-and/or intra-group solidarity

      For more ideas on what issues Voice prioritises on, please read the Voice Context Analysis summary. The full report will be made available upon request.

      Proposals need to be at least 18 – 30 months with a budget of up to €200,000.

      What do we mean by Influencing?

      Based on the Voice Theory of Change, Influencing is the process where rightsholders and their representatives will use a range of lobby and advocacy tools to influence individuals, families, communities, private business, religious leaders, (social) media, and other decision makers’ policies, practices, and behaviours. Ultimately, the combined interventions will lead to rightsholders:

      • claiming their rights as equal citizens;
      • having meaningful participation in political, economic, and social spheres, and;
      • accessing services and resources.

      Influencing should happen and move across multiple levels from individuals to communities to (sub-) national to international. Actions at the individual level can reinforce actions at other levels.

      Influencing grant targets organisations and networks to strengthen their lobby and advocacy capacities and amplify the voices of rightsholder groups.

      Who do we wish to fund?

      Applications will be accepted from ONLY locally registered not-for-profit local organisations working outside of Nairobi. We however would like to continue working in the following counties – Tana River, Kilifi, Kakamega, Laikipia, Samburu, and Narok County.  Applicants registered outside these Counties are nevertheless eligible to apply as far as they have a project base/office in the focal Counties and can provide the intervention there without undue travel cost on Voice. International organisations are NOT eligible to apply as lead organisations but can be co-applicants in case of consortium applications.

      What we won’t fund:

      • Organisations with an annual turnover of over €2 million.
      • An application where the grant awarded from Voice is more than 50% of the total annual income of the applicant organisation.
        • The way to calculate this is to divide the requested amount by number of years the project will be implemented. The result will then be divided by the annual income.
        • If the result of this calculation is over 50% you can either reduce the requested amount or team up as part of a consortium where you can add up the annual incomes.
      • Funding of commercial services, investment or other commercial activities.

      Practicing the Values of Voice

      Voice believes in the principle of Nothing About Us Without Us. In practice, this means Voice rightsholder groups need to be at the centre of any effort. They must be involved in the conceptualisation, planning, and implementation of any grant. They are equal partners in any consortium, network, or coalition, playing key governance and leadership roles.

      Linking and Learning

      Linking and Learning is at the heart and soul of Voice. All grantees are expected to participate in facilitated meetings and gatherings enabling the exchange of ideas and learnings from each other’s experiences.  Applicants must demonstrate in their proposals how they will identify, document, and share their learnings as they implement their project. These may come in many forms such as blog posts, videos, photo essay or audio recordings.

      Voice values diversity and inclusion. All grantees are expected to be able to interact with and learn from a diverse group of people coming from different backgrounds, orientations, and experiences. Interested applicants must be willing to work in a diverse community, which includes representatives from all of the Voice rightsholder groups.

    • How to apply?

      To submit your application, follow these steps below:

      1. Take the Eligibility Test in the next tab.
      2. Read the Grant Manual for guidelines on how to apply and what is expected of grantees.
      3. Read the Context Analysis summary to learn more about issues Voice rightsholder groups face.

      Submit your narrative proposal through the online application system and attach the following documents:

      1. Workplan
      2. Risk Management Matrix
      3. Budget Template

      The deadline for submission is 15th January 2021 @2359Hrs EAT.

      Note for your consideration: Download this document with the application questions to help you draft or practice your responses. DO NOT submit this as your application, instead, transfer/copy and paste your responses to the online application system.

    • Eligibility Test

  • How to apply?

    To submit your application, follow these steps below:

    1. Take the Eligibility Test in the next tab.
    2. Read the Grant Manual for guidelines on how to apply and what is expected of grantees.
    3. Read the Context Analysis summary to learn more about issues Voice rightsholder groups face.

    Submit your narrative proposal through the online application system and attach the following documents:

    1. Workplan
    2. Risk Management Matrix
    3. Budget Template

    The deadline for submission is 15th January 2021 @2359Hrs EAT.

    Note for your consideration: Download this document with the application questions to help you draft or practice your responses. DO NOT submit this as your application, instead, transfer/copy and paste your responses to the online application system.

  • Eligibility Test

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