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  • Organisation

    Perempuan Mahardika is a women’s organization that was founded in 2003. Initiated by women’s rights activists from different backgrounds, we are deeply rooted in local communities and the feminist movements, as we utilize feminist lenses as our tools to analyze and strategize our movement in order to bring forth societies that are prosperous, equal, ecological, and free from all forms of violence, exploitation as well as discrimination.

    Our vision is to bring forth a world in which everyone is economically prosperous, and are able to realize their rights and opportunities to take place in economic, political, social as well as cultural activities without being limited by their gender, ethnicity, belief systems, dis/ability, field of work, age, or any other indicators that are related to their personal identity.

    Our mission is to push for women’s participation and build women’s movement, as well as supporting other social organizations in fighting for social justice and human rights enforcement.

    To fulfill our mission, we have four ‘program pillars’ as follows:
    1. Organizing grass-root level communities to strengthen women’s collective
    2. Developing feminist education and knowledge
    3. Feminist research
    4. Advocacy
    When conducting our activities, we are upholding these principles:
    1. Everyone has the same rights
    2. Women human rights is the core of our struggle
    3. Valuing democracy and human rights
    4. Believing science
    5. Building solidarities with fellow social movements who are fighting alongside us.

    Policies, guidelines, and other documents that our organization has:

    1. Memorandum of Association/Articles of Association
    2. Finance Standard Operating Procedures

    Our organization’s most important accomplishments are:o
    1. We are working with other organisations, and we contributed to them by providing knowledge related to gender perspective, which in turn help foster their understanding and build their movement
    2. We are part of the ‘drivers’ during the installation of the “Kawasan Berikat Nusantara Free from Sexual Harassment” in 2017
    3. We founded Mahardika Rainbow Collective, a collective for LBT textile workers in 2015
    4. We are working closely with LGBTIQ+ organisations and movements
    5. We produced numerous researches that can be utilized by partners and stakeholders
    6. We are consistently using feminist perspectives in discussing political, social, and cultural issues

    Organizational uniqueness

    First, Perempuan Mahardika is a place where fighters and activists from different backgrounds; such as labor movement, youth, and LBT ‘coverge’. This intersection is reflected in our organizational structure and work programs. Second, Perempuan Mahardika consists of multiple women’s collectives. Now we host 6 women’s collectives which are: Rainbow Mahardika (Pelangi Mahardika), Young and Loud (Muda Bersuara), GerPuan, Feminist Study Circle, Balla Makunrai, and we will keep developing
    our collectives in the future.

    • Organisation

      Perempuan Mahardika is a women’s organization that was founded in 2003. Initiated by women’s rights activists from different backgrounds, we are deeply rooted in local communities and the feminist movements, as we utilize feminist lenses as our tools to analyze and strategize our movement in order to bring forth societies that are prosperous, equal, ecological, and free from all forms of violence, exploitation as well as discrimination.

      Our vision is to bring forth a world in which everyone is economically prosperous, and are able to realize their rights and opportunities to take place in economic, political, social as well as cultural activities without being limited by their gender, ethnicity, belief systems, dis/ability, field of work, age, or any other indicators that are related to their personal identity.

      Our mission is to push for women’s participation and build women’s movement, as well as supporting other social organizations in fighting for social justice and human rights enforcement.

      To fulfill our mission, we have four ‘program pillars’ as follows:
      1. Organizing grass-root level communities to strengthen women’s collective
      2. Developing feminist education and knowledge
      3. Feminist research
      4. Advocacy
      When conducting our activities, we are upholding these principles:
      1. Everyone has the same rights
      2. Women human rights is the core of our struggle
      3. Valuing democracy and human rights
      4. Believing science
      5. Building solidarities with fellow social movements who are fighting alongside us.

      Policies, guidelines, and other documents that our organization has:

      1. Memorandum of Association/Articles of Association
      2. Finance Standard Operating Procedures

      Our organization’s most important accomplishments are:o
      1. We are working with other organisations, and we contributed to them by providing knowledge related to gender perspective, which in turn help foster their understanding and build their movement
      2. We are part of the ‘drivers’ during the installation of the “Kawasan Berikat Nusantara Free from Sexual Harassment” in 2017
      3. We founded Mahardika Rainbow Collective, a collective for LBT textile workers in 2015
      4. We are working closely with LGBTIQ+ organisations and movements
      5. We produced numerous researches that can be utilized by partners and stakeholders
      6. We are consistently using feminist perspectives in discussing political, social, and cultural issues

      Organizational uniqueness

      First, Perempuan Mahardika is a place where fighters and activists from different backgrounds; such as labor movement, youth, and LBT ‘coverge’. This intersection is reflected in our organizational structure and work programs. Second, Perempuan Mahardika consists of multiple women’s collectives. Now we host 6 women’s collectives which are: Rainbow Mahardika (Pelangi Mahardika), Young and Loud (Muda Bersuara), GerPuan, Feminist Study Circle, Balla Makunrai, and we will keep developing
      our collectives in the future.

    • Project

      The project “Strengthening Advocacy for Female Labor towards the Ratification of Convention No.190 (C190)” is about the adoption of convention No.190 and Recommendation No.206 provide us with a tangible framework to work towards the protection of all labor, regardless of their statuses; to ensure that they are free from any forms of workplace violence and harassment. This convention also ensures that all member states respect the convention by carrying out 3 obligations, one of which is to ratify the convention.

      The convention is very specific. First, the content doesn’t only regulate violence and harassment that are happening in the workplace, but in all working environments; thus, the convention effectively covers any forms of violence and harassment that are happening at domestic places, streets, and working places. Second, the convention acknowledges the need to provide protection and assist survivors of domestic violence in their recovery. Third, the convention also focuses on inclusivity; by stating that all labor must be protected regardless of the type of working contract, which includes interns, volunteers, job-seekers, employees, retirees, and employers. The clause regarding inclusivity also covers both private and public spheres, formal and informal sectors, and all types of works regardless of the location; be it in urban or rural areas. It also encompasses workers from minority groups such as people with disabilities, LGBTIQ+ community, ethnic minorities, etc. Fourth, the convention recognizes internship students as labor.

      Data from various studies that we have in our inventory show that gender-based violence in the workplace is impacting women’s participation negatively, and this is a serious issue. Types of violence and harassment that usually happen to labor, especially female labor, are violence and harassment that are targeting women’s bodies. Informal labor, such as domestic workers and freelancers are experiencing multiple layers of violence, such as unlimited workloads, long working hours, the absence of social security, etc. These conditions also threatened other vulnerable labor groups, such as people with disabilities. Although according to Law on Disabilities (No.8/2016), 2% of the labor force in government agencies must be allocated to persons with disabilities (and 1% for private companies), the implementation of this law is still far from ideal. Disabled workers are becoming victims of violence on multiple layers, mostly in form of workplace discrimination.

      In a state of labor vulnerability, Indonesia issued Omnibus Law on Job Creation (Undang-Undang Cipta Kerja), which was passed in 2020. The content of this law might worsen female labor’s condition; due to long working hours, less paid leave allowance, less wages, longer non-permanent working contract duration, and discrimination towards disabled workers. Omnibus Law on Job Creation, together with the COVID-19 pandemic, prove to be a heavy blow towards the lives of Indonesian labor. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics Indonesia (Badan Pusat Statistik or BPS – or simply, Statistics Indonesia), 3.5 million labor in Indonesia were fired from their workplace. Aside from losing their jobs, female laborers are also faced with an increasing number of domestic violence cases during their work from home days. In regards to this situation, the Omnibus Law on Job Creation might worsen the condition of female labor due to:
      1. Long working hours and decreasing paid leave allowance will impact female labor’s welfare
      2. The normalization of the non-permanent working contracts will put female labor in a vulnerable position
      3. Discrimination against informal workers, as well as disabled workers, will cause the loss of opportunity for women with disabilities, that are looking to enter the workforce

  • Project

    The project “Strengthening Advocacy for Female Labor towards the Ratification of Convention No.190 (C190)” is about the adoption of convention No.190 and Recommendation No.206 provide us with a tangible framework to work towards the protection of all labor, regardless of their statuses; to ensure that they are free from any forms of workplace violence and harassment. This convention also ensures that all member states respect the convention by carrying out 3 obligations, one of which is to ratify the convention.

    The convention is very specific. First, the content doesn’t only regulate violence and harassment that are happening in the workplace, but in all working environments; thus, the convention effectively covers any forms of violence and harassment that are happening at domestic places, streets, and working places. Second, the convention acknowledges the need to provide protection and assist survivors of domestic violence in their recovery. Third, the convention also focuses on inclusivity; by stating that all labor must be protected regardless of the type of working contract, which includes interns, volunteers, job-seekers, employees, retirees, and employers. The clause regarding inclusivity also covers both private and public spheres, formal and informal sectors, and all types of works regardless of the location; be it in urban or rural areas. It also encompasses workers from minority groups such as people with disabilities, LGBTIQ+ community, ethnic minorities, etc. Fourth, the convention recognizes internship students as labor.

    Data from various studies that we have in our inventory show that gender-based violence in the workplace is impacting women’s participation negatively, and this is a serious issue. Types of violence and harassment that usually happen to labor, especially female labor, are violence and harassment that are targeting women’s bodies. Informal labor, such as domestic workers and freelancers are experiencing multiple layers of violence, such as unlimited workloads, long working hours, the absence of social security, etc. These conditions also threatened other vulnerable labor groups, such as people with disabilities. Although according to Law on Disabilities (No.8/2016), 2% of the labor force in government agencies must be allocated to persons with disabilities (and 1% for private companies), the implementation of this law is still far from ideal. Disabled workers are becoming victims of violence on multiple layers, mostly in form of workplace discrimination.

    In a state of labor vulnerability, Indonesia issued Omnibus Law on Job Creation (Undang-Undang Cipta Kerja), which was passed in 2020. The content of this law might worsen female labor’s condition; due to long working hours, less paid leave allowance, less wages, longer non-permanent working contract duration, and discrimination towards disabled workers. Omnibus Law on Job Creation, together with the COVID-19 pandemic, prove to be a heavy blow towards the lives of Indonesian labor. According to the Central Bureau of Statistics Indonesia (Badan Pusat Statistik or BPS – or simply, Statistics Indonesia), 3.5 million labor in Indonesia were fired from their workplace. Aside from losing their jobs, female laborers are also faced with an increasing number of domestic violence cases during their work from home days. In regards to this situation, the Omnibus Law on Job Creation might worsen the condition of female labor due to:
    1. Long working hours and decreasing paid leave allowance will impact female labor’s welfare
    2. The normalization of the non-permanent working contracts will put female labor in a vulnerable position
    3. Discrimination against informal workers, as well as disabled workers, will cause the loss of opportunity for women with disabilities, that are looking to enter the workforce

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