Voice.Global website

  • Organisation

    The Association for Development of Women and Legal Education (ADWLE) is a Non-Profit Association (NPA) in Laos. Originally called the Women’s Rights Study Association, the Association was created unofficially in 2008 by a CEDAW Resource Pool, consisting of 10 women and two men, with the intention to promote gender equality and women’s rights in Lao PDR. The founders of ADWLE applied to be an NPA with the Ministry of Home Affairs (MOHA) in 2010. In April 2012, ADWLE was given a temporary license, after which, it elected five Administrative and Inspection Board members. ADWLE was registered on 9 November 2012 in Vientiane Capital, Lao PDR.

    Since its inception, ADWLE has worked with the Faculties of Law and Political Sciences of the National University of Laos (NUoL), Vientiane Capital, and Champasak University, Champasak Province, as well as with targeted village communities.

    Their projects have focused largely on: legal education relating to gender and national and international women’s rights laws and instruments; capacity building, in the form of trainings and outreach activities; and, most recently, the provision of free legal advice and assistance to female victims of gender-based violence.

    At present, ADWLE has six staff working full time: Director, Gender Manager, Law Manager, Financial and Administrative Officer, Project Support Manager and Project Assistant. They have academic and professional backgrounds in a variety of fields, including law, political science, finance, agriculture, and education. The team works actively in the field to promote gender equality, women’s rights and the protection of women from human trafficking. The legal aid clinic is run by a principal lawyer and nine part-time lawyers.

    In order to assist with carrying out its activities, ADWLE has a variety of partners, including the Faculties of Law and Political Sciences of NUoL and Champasak Universities, the National Commission for the Advancement of Women, the National Assembly, the Ministry of Justice, the Lao Bar Association and numerous international organisations and local civil society organisations.

     

    • Organisation

      The Association for Development of Women and Legal Education (ADWLE) is a Non-Profit Association (NPA) in Laos. Originally called the Women’s Rights Study Association, the Association was created unofficially in 2008 by a CEDAW Resource Pool, consisting of 10 women and two men, with the intention to promote gender equality and women’s rights in Lao PDR. The founders of ADWLE applied to be an NPA with the Ministry of Home Affairs (MOHA) in 2010. In April 2012, ADWLE was given a temporary license, after which, it elected five Administrative and Inspection Board members. ADWLE was registered on 9 November 2012 in Vientiane Capital, Lao PDR.

      Since its inception, ADWLE has worked with the Faculties of Law and Political Sciences of the National University of Laos (NUoL), Vientiane Capital, and Champasak University, Champasak Province, as well as with targeted village communities.

      Their projects have focused largely on: legal education relating to gender and national and international women’s rights laws and instruments; capacity building, in the form of trainings and outreach activities; and, most recently, the provision of free legal advice and assistance to female victims of gender-based violence.

      At present, ADWLE has six staff working full time: Director, Gender Manager, Law Manager, Financial and Administrative Officer, Project Support Manager and Project Assistant. They have academic and professional backgrounds in a variety of fields, including law, political science, finance, agriculture, and education. The team works actively in the field to promote gender equality, women’s rights and the protection of women from human trafficking. The legal aid clinic is run by a principal lawyer and nine part-time lawyers.

      In order to assist with carrying out its activities, ADWLE has a variety of partners, including the Faculties of Law and Political Sciences of NUoL and Champasak Universities, the National Commission for the Advancement of Women, the National Assembly, the Ministry of Justice, the Lao Bar Association and numerous international organisations and local civil society organisations.

       

    • Project

      Previous to Voice, Association for the Development of Women and Legal education (ADWLE) pioneered an approach to gender-based violence in 9 target villages in Vientiane Capital. In these communities, gender based violence and domestic violence have been identified as a significant problem facing women. In aiming to address this problem, ADWLE has identified several major causes of gender inequality which lead to many types of gender-discriminatory practices, such as gender-discriminatory attitudes about gender roles (ie women should serve men, not make decisions); lack of knowledge on gender and gender-related laws by Village Authorities and villagers; high tolerance for GBV in the community by both men and women; use of customary laws which are unfavourable to women; lack of enforcement of domestic laws by law enforcement bodies; lack of knowledge on safe migration; and drug and alcohol abuse. In interviews conducted in participating communities at the beginning of the project in all four villages, on 13/07/2015, 70% of women villagers said they experience some form of gender inequality.

      Furthermore, at the first official level of dispute mediation, Village Authorities and Village Mediation centre often have little knowledge of gender issues or domestic laws related to domestic violence. Domestic violence cases are often resolved at this level without going further, however authorities lack of knowledge on gender issues and domestic laws against domestic violence make it difficult to come to a solution which is fair for the victim in the case.

      ADWLE has been implementing a series of activities for villagers and Village Authorities on women’s rights, CEDAW, gender sensitive mediation methodology, as well as raising awareness in the communities about drugs, human trafficking and domestic laws which make domestic violence illegal.

      This project has encompassed many different approaches and activities which have reduced marginalisation of women and girls, particularly of ethnic minorities by empowering women and girls to have the capacity to know their rights, and lobby for them in their local community.

      Building on the results of the above, and with the Voice funding, ADWLE aims to test more innovative approaches in dealing with gender (in)equality. Many activities will continue on from the first phase, however ADWLE aims to support a stronger engagement with gender issues at the grassroots and community level in 2 specific areas, with the goal of shifting the focus from traditional training and workshops to more participatory methods.

      This shift in focus involves changes in some of the types of activities that are done at Village level to be more participatory and less focused on top-down traditional training. ADWLE  implements the GALS methodology in trainings with newly married couples from target villages who will become gender champions and key change makers in the community. It also facilitates the creation of two advocacy groups to be run by villagers; Women’s Champions, and Men Standing Up.

      There are gender-separated groups for women and men to be trained and to advocate for women’s rights, and they are supported by the Gender Champions who participate in GALS training.

      This project also involves expanding the reach of ADWLE’s support for access to legal education with the opening of the Women’s Assistance and Counselling Unit (WACU) in the centre of Vientiane Capital City. This is because, though the first phase of the project saw several successes, ADWLE wants to support increased community engagements with gender and legal issues the first phase dealt with.

       

  • Project

    Previous to Voice, Association for the Development of Women and Legal education (ADWLE) pioneered an approach to gender-based violence in 9 target villages in Vientiane Capital. In these communities, gender based violence and domestic violence have been identified as a significant problem facing women. In aiming to address this problem, ADWLE has identified several major causes of gender inequality which lead to many types of gender-discriminatory practices, such as gender-discriminatory attitudes about gender roles (ie women should serve men, not make decisions); lack of knowledge on gender and gender-related laws by Village Authorities and villagers; high tolerance for GBV in the community by both men and women; use of customary laws which are unfavourable to women; lack of enforcement of domestic laws by law enforcement bodies; lack of knowledge on safe migration; and drug and alcohol abuse. In interviews conducted in participating communities at the beginning of the project in all four villages, on 13/07/2015, 70% of women villagers said they experience some form of gender inequality.

    Furthermore, at the first official level of dispute mediation, Village Authorities and Village Mediation centre often have little knowledge of gender issues or domestic laws related to domestic violence. Domestic violence cases are often resolved at this level without going further, however authorities lack of knowledge on gender issues and domestic laws against domestic violence make it difficult to come to a solution which is fair for the victim in the case.

    ADWLE has been implementing a series of activities for villagers and Village Authorities on women’s rights, CEDAW, gender sensitive mediation methodology, as well as raising awareness in the communities about drugs, human trafficking and domestic laws which make domestic violence illegal.

    This project has encompassed many different approaches and activities which have reduced marginalisation of women and girls, particularly of ethnic minorities by empowering women and girls to have the capacity to know their rights, and lobby for them in their local community.

    Building on the results of the above, and with the Voice funding, ADWLE aims to test more innovative approaches in dealing with gender (in)equality. Many activities will continue on from the first phase, however ADWLE aims to support a stronger engagement with gender issues at the grassroots and community level in 2 specific areas, with the goal of shifting the focus from traditional training and workshops to more participatory methods.

    This shift in focus involves changes in some of the types of activities that are done at Village level to be more participatory and less focused on top-down traditional training. ADWLE  implements the GALS methodology in trainings with newly married couples from target villages who will become gender champions and key change makers in the community. It also facilitates the creation of two advocacy groups to be run by villagers; Women’s Champions, and Men Standing Up.

    There are gender-separated groups for women and men to be trained and to advocate for women’s rights, and they are supported by the Gender Champions who participate in GALS training.

    This project also involves expanding the reach of ADWLE’s support for access to legal education with the opening of the Women’s Assistance and Counselling Unit (WACU) in the centre of Vientiane Capital City. This is because, though the first phase of the project saw several successes, ADWLE wants to support increased community engagements with gender and legal issues the first phase dealt with.

     

Whistleblower

Voice is committed to providing safe spaces filled with integrity and respect for ALL people as well as for financial resources.

Click here for more information on our Whistle-blower policy & Procedure