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  • Organisation

    Asia Justice and Rights (AJAR) is a non-profit organisation registered in Indonesia, whose aim is to contribute to the strengthening of human rights and the alleviation of entrenched impunity in the Asia-Pacific region. AJAR focuses on countries involved in transition from a context of mass human rights violations to democracy. It strives to build cultures based on accountability to help prevent the recurrence of state-sanctioned human rights violations.

    AJAR achieves its goals through empowering key individuals and groups who are involved in the long-term struggle for truth, accountability, and justice in their national contexts. AJAR does this through:

    • trainings, exchanges, and strengthening networks to increase the knowledge and capacity of survivors, human rights defenders, and government officials;
    • research to establish and share the truth concerning mass human rights violations using participatory methods;
    • utilise research results in advocacy to national, regional, and international organizations;
    • increase popular, broad-based understanding of human rights, justice, tolerance, gender equity, etc. through use of mass media;
    • contribute to the empowerment of women survivors and human rights defenders so that their voices have an increased impact on policy and practice.

    AJAR has a unique contribution to human rights in Indonesia. They are a global south NGO with regional and international experience, but also strong relationships based on trust with local partners and survivors’ communities. AJAR has a commitment and understanding that justice is a long process that requires building social movements in each context that has experienced the violations.

    • Organisation

      Asia Justice and Rights (AJAR) is a non-profit organisation registered in Indonesia, whose aim is to contribute to the strengthening of human rights and the alleviation of entrenched impunity in the Asia-Pacific region. AJAR focuses on countries involved in transition from a context of mass human rights violations to democracy. It strives to build cultures based on accountability to help prevent the recurrence of state-sanctioned human rights violations.

      AJAR achieves its goals through empowering key individuals and groups who are involved in the long-term struggle for truth, accountability, and justice in their national contexts. AJAR does this through:

      • trainings, exchanges, and strengthening networks to increase the knowledge and capacity of survivors, human rights defenders, and government officials;
      • research to establish and share the truth concerning mass human rights violations using participatory methods;
      • utilise research results in advocacy to national, regional, and international organizations;
      • increase popular, broad-based understanding of human rights, justice, tolerance, gender equity, etc. through use of mass media;
      • contribute to the empowerment of women survivors and human rights defenders so that their voices have an increased impact on policy and practice.

      AJAR has a unique contribution to human rights in Indonesia. They are a global south NGO with regional and international experience, but also strong relationships based on trust with local partners and survivors’ communities. AJAR has a commitment and understanding that justice is a long process that requires building social movements in each context that has experienced the violations.

    • Project

      Two decades after the end of Soeharto’s dictatorship, many past atrocities in Indonesia remain unresolved. This includes the 1965 anti-communist violence affecting more than 500,000 people, and the lesser known issue of the “stolen children” of Timor-Leste. They were forcibly removed from their families and brought to Indonesia during the conflict of 1975-1999.

      Years, if not decades, have passed without redress for the survivors, some of whom are elderly, have physical disabilities due to violence, and face further stigmatisation as ethnic minorities. Most survivors’ voices are still silenced and unheard. Their children face the intergenerational impact of violence and are in need of emancipatory tools to access urgent needs of justice and social services.

      This project seeks to empower women survivors of the 1965 anti-communist violence, the stolen children of Timor-Leste, and the survivors’ children, through youth-led participatory action research (PAR) that encourages survivors to learn from their painful past, identify their needs, and draw from their strengths in order to increase their decision-making power and access to urgent needs. The project seek to review and deepen the methodology AJAR has used and scale up the methodology in other areas of Indonesia, bringing new target groups into the fold.

      The project HUMANITY for conflict survivors consists of trainings for youth survivors in PAR processes and multimedia production, a series of youth-led PAR processes that incorporate multimedia tools to document the stories of conflict survivors, a dialogue series with local authorities, and a parallel offline and online multimedia exhibit based on the data collected by youth survivors for the public sphere.

      At the end of the project, survivors and their children have made their stories heard and increased their agency for change in the public sphere and among local authorities, while strengthening their capacity for healing, intergenerational solidarity, and mobilisation towards an intersectional survivors’ movement.

  • Project

    Two decades after the end of Soeharto’s dictatorship, many past atrocities in Indonesia remain unresolved. This includes the 1965 anti-communist violence affecting more than 500,000 people, and the lesser known issue of the “stolen children” of Timor-Leste. They were forcibly removed from their families and brought to Indonesia during the conflict of 1975-1999.

    Years, if not decades, have passed without redress for the survivors, some of whom are elderly, have physical disabilities due to violence, and face further stigmatisation as ethnic minorities. Most survivors’ voices are still silenced and unheard. Their children face the intergenerational impact of violence and are in need of emancipatory tools to access urgent needs of justice and social services.

    This project seeks to empower women survivors of the 1965 anti-communist violence, the stolen children of Timor-Leste, and the survivors’ children, through youth-led participatory action research (PAR) that encourages survivors to learn from their painful past, identify their needs, and draw from their strengths in order to increase their decision-making power and access to urgent needs. The project seek to review and deepen the methodology AJAR has used and scale up the methodology in other areas of Indonesia, bringing new target groups into the fold.

    The project HUMANITY for conflict survivors consists of trainings for youth survivors in PAR processes and multimedia production, a series of youth-led PAR processes that incorporate multimedia tools to document the stories of conflict survivors, a dialogue series with local authorities, and a parallel offline and online multimedia exhibit based on the data collected by youth survivors for the public sphere.

    At the end of the project, survivors and their children have made their stories heard and increased their agency for change in the public sphere and among local authorities, while strengthening their capacity for healing, intergenerational solidarity, and mobilisation towards an intersectional survivors’ movement.

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